Detox & Rehydration

Overcoming an addiction to alcohol can be a long and bumpy road. At times, it may even feel impossible. But it’s not. If you’re ready to stop drinking and willing to get the support you need, you can recover from alcoholism and alcohol abuse—no matter how bad the addiction or how powerless you feel. You don’t have to wait until you hit rock bottom; you can make a change at any time.

fluids3Dr. Garcia can help your body recover the nutrition and electrolytes that it has lost due to drinking. This in itself helps to ease the withdraw symptoms, however this is just the first step in addressing an alcohol addiction.

Read to get started on the road to recovery today.
In This Article:

Commit to stop drinking
Set goals and prepare for change
Get sober safely
Find new meaning in life
Plan for triggers and cravings
Ask for help and support
Get started on treatment
Alcohol treatment and recovery 1: Commit to stop drinking

Most people with alcohol problems do not decide to make a big change out of the blue or transform their drinking habits overnight. Recovery is usually a more gradual process. In the early stages of change, denial is a huge obstacle. Even after admitting you have a drinking problem, you may make excuses and drag your feet. It’s important to acknowledge your ambivalence about stopping drinking. If you’re not sure if you’re ready to change or you’re struggling with the decision, it can help to think about the costs and benefits of each choice.
Evaluating the costs and benefits of drinking

Make a table like the one below, weighing the costs and benefits of drinking to the costs and benefits of quitting.

Is Drinking Worth The Cost?
Benefits of drinking: Benefits of not drinking:
  • It helps me forget about my problems.
  • I have fun when I drink.
  • It’s my way of relaxing and unwinding after a stressful day.
  • My relationships would probably improve.
  • I’d feel better mentally and physically.
  • I’d have more time and energy for the people and activities I care about.
Costs of drinking: Costs of not drinking:
  • It has caused problems in my relationships.
  • I feel depressed, anxious, and ashamed of myself.
  • It gets in the way of my job performance and family responsibilities.
  • I’d have to find another way to deal with problems.
  • I’d lose my drinking buddies.
  • I would have to face the responsibilities I’ve been ignoring.

Alcohol treatment and recovery 2: Set goals and prepare for change

Once you’ve made the decision to change, the next step is establishing clear drinking goals. The more specific, realistic, and clear your goals, the better.

Example #1: My drinking goal

I will stop drinking alcohol.
My quit date is __________.

Example #2: My drinking goal

I will stop drinking on weekdays, starting as of __________.
I will limit my Saturday and Sunday drinking to no more than 3 drinks per day or 5 drinks per weekend.
After three months, I will cut back my weekend drinking even more to a maximum of 2 drinks per day and 3 drinks per weekend.

Do you want to stop drinking altogether or just cut back? If your goal is to reduce your drinking, decide which days you will drink alcohol and how many drinks you will allow yourself per day. Try to commit to at least two days each week when you won’t drink at all.
When do you want to stop drinking or start drinking less? Tomorrow? In a week? Next month? Within six months? If you’re trying to stop drinking, set a specific quit date.

After you’ve set your goals to either stop or cut back your drinking, write down some ideas on how you can help yourself accomplish these goals. For example:

Get rid of temptations. Remove all alcohol, barware, and other drinking reminders from your home and office.
Announce your goal. Let friends, family members, and co-workers know that you’re trying to stop drinking. If they drink, ask them to support your recovery by not doing so in front of you.
Be upfront about your new limits. Make it clear that drinking will not be allowed in your home and that you may not be able to attend events where alcohol is being served.
Avoid bad influences. Distance yourself from people who don’t support your efforts to stop drinking or respect the limits you’ve set. This may mean giving up certain friends and social connections.
Learn from the past. Reflect on previous attempts to stop drinking. What worked? What didn’t? What can you do differently this time to avoid pitfalls?